News

  • Virtual Storytelling - Zoom

    Comments (-1)
  • Women’s History Month Provides Opportunity to Celebrate a Wide Variety of Women, Past and Present.

    March is designated as Women’s History Month and students throughout the Public Schools of the Tarrytowns discovered more about influential women through a variety of lessons. At W.L. Morse, Sandra Tavares created a wall with photos of noteworthy women that included Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Misty Copeland, Hellen Keller, Amelia Earhart and Malala Yousafzai. Students were encouraged to lead, learn, dance, inspire, write and educate others in a way similar to these role models.

    Comments (-1)
  • COVID 19 Screening Attestation for Students and Visitors

    Staff and Students: Please complete this short survey prior to coming to work or school https://entry.neric.org/tarrytown

    Comments (-1)
  • Elementary School Music Teachers Inspire Students During Music Month

    The National Association for Music Education (NAfME) designates March as Music in Our Schools Month to raise awareness of the importance of music in education. Although the pandemic has presented particular challenges for music classes this past year, our teachers continue to find creative ways to keep music a part of the curriculum. Two of those teachers joined the Public Schools of the Tarrytowns just this year; Mr. Jeffery Mizen teaches students in John Paulding and W.L. Morse and Ms. Abby Ferri is at Washington Irving.

    Comments (-1)
  • Mayor Butler Meets with Students and Shares Important Lesson about Perseverance and Teamwork

    “I think I can, I think I can….” Those four important words make many people think of the classic children’s book, “The Little Engine That Could” by Watty Piper. Although nearly a century old now, this inspirational message seems more relevant than ever. That is part of the reason that Village of Tarrytown Mayor Butler chose to read this particular book to second grade students at Morse elementary school.

    Comments (-1)
  • Morse Mural On Display at Warner Library

    Visitors to the Children’s Room at the Warner Library can now view art designed by students from the Public Schools of the Tarrytowns. During the 2018-2019 school year, first and second graders created a mural which art teacher Jeannette Dietz recently donated to the library.

    Comments (-1)
  • The Art of Persuasion

    First graders at W.L. Morse learned a valuable lesson in their recent writing lesson. The students discovered ways to write persuasively, a tool they can utilize throughout their lives.

    Comments (-1)
  • Wordless Books

    When you think about reading a book, more than likely you default to the concept of reading words on a page. However, there is another technique to support literacy that ENL (English as a New Language) teachers have been utilizing for years – wordless books. Teachers and students look at pictures, talk to each other and create the narration from what they see. Second grade teachers and Dual Language teachers at W.L. Morse received a series of wordless books to assist all learners.

    Comments (-1)
  • Safe Crossings Information

    Comments (-1)
  • Keeping With Tradition: Sleepy Hollow Police Officers Read to Children

    For years, members of the Sleepy Hollow Police Department visit with and read to students at Morse. This year, the Coronavirus prevented them from personally meeting with students, so instead, Student Resource Office McGuire, Officer Bencosme, Officer Sosa and Officer Martelo met with students over google meet.

    Comments (-1)
  • John Paulding and Morse Summer Literacy Program Reduces Summer Slide

    Rising first grade students used critical thinking skills and sounded out words as teacher Jenne Mazzarella read a story with them over the internet. These children who enrolled in the John Paulding and Morse Summer Literacy Program participated through Google during which teachers conducted a morning meeting with a group of 8 to 14 students and then presented a guided reading lesson. They also spent time in smaller groups with teachers focusing on reading strategies.

    Comments (-1)
  • Supply List

    Click above for links to Morse supply lists

    Comments (-1)
  • Transportation Corrections/Cambios de Transportación

    Comments (-1)
  • Back to School Presentation

    Comments (-1)
  • Morse Parent Forum

    Click to view the Parent Forum Presentations

    Comments (-1)
  • Student-Turned-Teacher Jovana Alejandro Returns to Her Roots

    As new second grade Dual Language instructor Jovana Alejandro set up her classroom at W.L. Morse, she reflected on her time as a student in the Public Schools of the Tarrytowns. A member of the Class of 2013, she is extremely excited to begin teaching at her old elementary school on September 10th.

    Comments (-1)
  • Welcome to W.L. Morse School

    Click to view the W.L. Morse School Orientation

    Comments (-1)
  • Distance Learning

    Dear W.L. Morse Parents, The Public Schools of the Tarrytowns will be closed for an extended period of time. We have spent time prior to this point in preparation for an extended closure. To help prevent regression in skills and concepts learned in school this year, teachers have provided assignments for students to complete at home.

    Comments (-1)
  • Remind

    To receive important messages please click below to access codes to join Morse Remind to receive important messages. Remind Directions English Remind Directions Spanish

    Comments (-1)
  • Students Celebrate the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr

    Second-grade students from Brenda Sutherland and Tobi Fradkin’s classes marched into the W.L. Morse auditorium on January 17, carrying signs with the phrases, “Imagine World Peace,” “Peace is Power,” “Spread Love.” The program entitled, “Sharing the Dream,” paid tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr and his legacy of nonviolence.

    Comments (-1)
  • The Morse Sensory Paths

    When you walk on the first and third floors at W.L. Morse, your eyes can not miss the brightly colored ‘sensory path’ that guides you through the hallways. The pathways, marked by flowers, handprints and swirls, is designed to help students refocus and release energy. In a traditional school setting, that energy can cause stress and could deter a student from achieving his or her best work. First-grader Isla Sheehan utilizes the sensory pathway to improve her concentration. She twirls and spins. “I use it a lot. It helps me calm down,” she said.

    Comments (-1)
  • Chess Club

    “You can move away, capture, you can block.” Chess Master Ramon Lorente explained these three options to students during a recent Chess Club meeting when he displayed cut-outs of chess pieces on a large board. The W.L. Morse students are only in second grade, yet they understand the concepts of check and checkmate and they eagerly came up to the board with a suggestion for the next move.

    Comments (-1)
  • Pumpkin Trip

    On Friday October 25th, all of second grade got to experience a really exciting and wonderful trip to Wilken’s Farm in Yorktown Heights, NY. At the farm, students were able to take a tractor ride into the pumpkin field/patch, climb on some haystacks, see how the cider donuts are made and even have a picnic lunch outside in the field.

    Comments (-1)
  • How Do You Feel?

    Author and illustrator Lizzy Rockwell was welcomed at W.L. Morse School to share her new book, How Do You Feel?, with students and guide them in discussion. The book uses art to reveal a variety of changing emotions of ten children playing in a city playground. Because it is visual storytelling, it allows readers to interpret the facial expressions, events and interactions their own wa

    Comments (-1)
  • Tarrytown Schools Tackle Summer Slump

    Summer learning loss is a serious and substantiated problem, according to research done by the National Education Association. The Tarrytown School District works hard to combat this challenge through its Summer Literacy Institute, an initiative started five years ago by the Foundation for the Public Schools of the Tarrytowns in response to parents who expressed an urgent need for literacy reinforcement. In that time, the program has grown from one class of 16 students to six classes of more than 70. The rising first, second and third-graders read and discuss a book and then participate in word work where they focus on letters and sounds. Then they form smaller groups and receive more individualized attention. The program runs three hours a day for two weeks in August.

    Comments (-1)
CLOSE
CLOSE